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Preschool, Grade R, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, Grade 4, Grade 5, Grade 6, Grade 7

Are you considering assigning chores to your child or feeling frustrated with having to constantly remind your children to do their chores?

In this post, we’ll share some insight into why children may resist doing chores and, despite the constant whining, why you should continue to assign chores in your household.

Why do children moan about completing chores?
Well, because they’re kids. And as developing humans they’re learning what it takes to be a valuable part of their family, community and society. So before they’ve developed these life skills young children and teenagers tend to be:

Lacking in judgment
Most young children rarely have a clue how much work is involved in managing a household.

Self-indulgent
They want what they want when they want it, which is more often than not NOW. Participating in activities where gratification is not immediate is probably seen as a chore in itself. It just doesn’t rank high on their agenda.

Self-centered
It’s in a child’s nature to be focused and concerned mainly about their needs and what matters to them. They do not naturally consider the needs and expectations of others.
 
So why should you start or continue with assigning household chores to you children?

We understand that it’s frustrating and sometimes disheartening to constantly remind your kids to pick up their clothes or toys or to hear,

“I know, I was just about to do it.”
“I just need to finish this”
“Why do I have to do it, none of my friends 
do?”
 
So here are 7 reasons that will help encourage you to keep chores on your family's to-do list.
 
  1. It teaches children important life skills such as doing laundry, cooking and cleaning.
    Yes, it’s hard for us to think about our little prince and princesses growing up and leaving the nest, but we would probably all sleep a lot easier knowing that our kids are able to clean up after themselves and cook a decent meal so they don’t live off takeaways.
  2. In younger children, it helps develop gross motor skills and hand-eye coordination.
    This reason is great for kids and for parents. Not only are you helping your child learn the value of being responsible, you’re also helping them succeed in the classroom. We think this deserves a bonus point.
  3. Children learn to co-operate and this helps them become better team players, co-workers, and eventually partners.
    If you’ve got a husband that isn’t scared to tackle the laundry, cooking or dishes (even if he just knows how to operate the dishwasher) then you know what a life saver it can be. Besides, no one wants to sit next to Messy Molly or Matthew at the office.
  4. Despite the moaning, kids actually love to help out.
    It empowers them and boosts their self-esteem. Children take pride in feeling that they are needed and important within the family.
  5. Doing things for themselves helps foster personal responsibility and independence.
    If you start to think of accomplishing chores as milestones in your child’s development then it sheds a more positive light on the subject. Think back to the day when your little baby first started holding their own bottle or sippy cup. You probably took a hundred photographs and announced it with pride. From crawling to walking, from setting the table to making their first sandwich, these are moments in our children’s lives that need to be celebrated.
  6. Children who do chores regularly learn the value of taking care of their belongings.
    When children are given the responsibility to look after their things, they tend to take better care of them. The key to getting this right is to ensure that your child learns the consequence of not taking care of their things. Learning the importance of taking care of the things that are given to you is an important life lesson that assigning chores can help teach.

    And lastly…

  7. When your kids help out around the house, it reduces Mom and Dad’s work load of tedious tasks, and frees up more time for families to have fun and spend quality time together.

So next time you feel a sudden twinge of guilt about assigning chores to your child, STOP!

Whether it is helping to set the table, packing their school bag before bed, or putting away toys, children can play a role in helping their home run smoothly and learn many real life benefits in the process.

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